Hungry? Eat A Cricket

Really.  I'm not kidding.  It's what may save us when drought and infectious disease and the end of the world destroys all the plants and animals and anything else we eat.

Sorry.  That's really depressing.  But the good news is that insects -- I'm not talking cockroaches, let's get real here -- are truly good for us.

Experts say insects are a sustainable alternative protein source with nutritional benefits that can’t be ignored.

One, they're as full of protein as a steak.  A cricket is 65 percent protein whereas beef is about 50 percent. (Think I'd rather have the ribeye). 

Two, they're high in other nutrients.  Insect protein contains a good range of amino acids and they also contain vitamins, minerals, unsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Want a third reason (and possibly the best?)?  They're low in fat.  Many insect species have less than 5 grams of fat per serving.

It's also good for the environment. Insect farming can be a more sustainable practice because insects don’t need much space, can live under all sorts of conditions and easy to feed.

And they can be eaten in a variety of ways.  Insects can be pan-fried, boiled, sautéed, roasted, or baked with a bit of oil and salt. They can also be made into flour and used for bars, breads, crackers, and cookies.

They're also abundant.  Where can't you find them?  Check out my backyard for mosquitoes after dark.  I could have a feast!  Imagine this. Some parts of the world have over 300 species of insects. Ugh!



And this one I will have to leave to the experts, but they say they taste great.  People describe the taste of insects as nutty with a similar flavor to shrimp and chicken. Grasshoppers, ant eggs, and wasps are considered a delicacy in several countries.

The only way you'd get me to eat one?  Covered in chocolate.  And maybe not even then. 

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