Soda with 250 Calories? Walk Five Miles to Burn it Off

I remember hearing that you have to walk a football field to burn off one M&M. (Not true.)

But not too far from it.

Adolescents who saw printed signs explaining the number of miles they would need to walk to burn off the calories in a sugary drink were more likely to leave the store with a lower calorie beverage, a healthier beverage or a smaller size beverage, according to new Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health research.

The study says this adds to the growing evidence suggesting that simply showing calorie counts on products and menus isn’t enough to break Americans from their bad eating habits. With calorie counts expected on menus in chain restaurants with more than 20 outlets by early next year the Affordable Care Act, the researchers say policymakers may need to rethink how that information is communicated.

 “People don’t really understand what it means to say a typical soda has 250 calories,” says study leader Sara N. Bleich, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School. “If you’re going to give people calorie information, there’s probably a better way to do it. What our research found is that when you explain calories in an easily understandable way, such as how many miles of walking needed to burn them off, you can encourage behavior change.”

Or make them never check calories again.

The study found that, when they told the kids participating in it that each bottle contained 250 calories, had 16 teaspoons of sugar, would take 50 minutes of running to work off those calories or would take five miles to walk the calories off, guess what?  They decided to have diet soda.

I'm rethinking those M&Ms right now.









Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Who does Donald Trump Really Hate? Himself.

Did You Know Emojis Could Do THAT?

Is It Better to Wait?