Warming World? Expect More Kidney Stones

For those of you out there who don't believe in climate change, may you get kidney stones.

I have them, and they're no fun.

That's because a new study has found, as daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates, according to newswise.com.

We found that as daily temperatures rise, there is a rapid increase in the probability of patients presenting over the next 20 days with kidney stones,” said study leader Gregory E. Tasian, M.D., M.Sc., M.S.C.E., a pediatric urologist and epidemiologist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), who is on the staff of the Hospital’s Kidney Stone Center as well as the Hospital’s Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness (CPCE).

The study team analyzed medical records of more than 60,000 adults and children with kidney stones between 2005 and 2011 in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles and Philadelphia, in connection with weather data.  As mean daily temperatures rose above 50 F (10 C), the risk of kidney stones  increased in all the cities except Los Angeles. The delay between high daily temperatures and kidney stone presentation was short, peaking within three days of exposure to hot days.

Experts say it's likely that higher temperatures increase the risk of kidney stones in those people predisposed to stone formation. Higher temperatures contribute to dehydration, which leads to a higher concentration of calcium and other minerals in the urine that promote the growth of kidney stones.

At least I'm not alone.  The story notes that half a million people a year go to the ER for treatment of these very painful little blobs of calcium.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Who does Donald Trump Really Hate? Himself.

Did You Know Emojis Could Do THAT?

Is It Better to Wait?